TOP HEADLINES

Physicians warming to Affordable Care Act

After much initial backlash to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), physicians are beginning to rate the law and some of its components more favorably, according to a new survey from the Medicus Firm physician search consultancy.

Access to psychiatric care severely limited in major cities

Despite a recent movement to increase primary care physicians' ability to identify mental-health problems in their patients, many may struggle to get their patients access to psychiatric care, according to a study published online today by Psychiatric Services.

Misinformation, cost anxiety persist among privately insured

With insured patients' out-of-pocket costs on the rise, nearly one-fifth of privately insured Americans admittedly avoided seeing a doctor for an illness or injury over the past year, according to new research conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

ACA's long-term impact on malpractice rates unknown

Medical malpractice premiums in several specialties have declined slightly or stayed flat over the past year, according to Medical Liability Monitor's annual rate survey. Overall, 65 percent of liability insurance rates remained steady nationwide, with obstetrician/gynecologists, internists and general surgeons experiencing decreases for the seventh straight year, reported Medscape Medical News.

Is a trial merger a smart step?

Medical practice insiders often compare a group merger to a marriage--meaning it takes compatibility, trust, communication and work to succeed. Two practices in the Louisville, Kentucky area are pretty sure they have what it takes, but will take the unusual step of actually "living together" before making their union official, according to an article from Louisville Business First.

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From Our Sister Sites

FierceHealthIT

With healthcare breaches becoming routine, there's a thriving black market for medical identity information. And criminals are using the information in a variety of ways, according to a  Fortune  article.

FierceHealthPayer

Removing tax credits that help low- and moderate-income people buy health insurance on exchanges would increase premiums by nearly 45 percent, according to results of a Rand Corp.  s tudy. M ore than 11 million Americans would lose coverage.